War Canoe

The Double Helix

About Me

Hello

I'mJason Anson

a Sociology Student

In 2017, I started studying Sociology at Athabasca University towards a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology. This website may be of interest and use to politicians, academics, Indigenous people of Canada or anyone else concerned about whether or not progress has been made in this area. Specifically my research focuses on the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action #87 through #91.

Using a macrosociological and microsociological framework for analysis, I am working towards answering the question: Why has only one First Nation person gone to the Olympics in the sport of Canoe in 100 years? To do this, I have been observing and researching this topic since 2011 and I will continue through to the end goal of the 2024 Paris Olympic summer games. The 100 year anniversary since Canada demonstrated the sport of Canoe at the 1924 Paris Olympic summer games. Until then, this website will stay in a construction like zone as my research continues.

SomeUniversity Grades

Storyboard Design/Development: A+

Intro to Sociology II: B+

Research Methods in the SOSC: A-

Social Problems: B+

Docuseries: War Canoeology

The Sociological Imagination

Episode: Intro

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Episode: #87

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Episode: #88

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Episode: #89

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Episode: #90

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Episode: #91

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Government of Canada Progress

On December 15, 2015,Justice Murray Sinclair released the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) 94 Calls to Action. On the same day, CBC reported that "the Prime Minister reiterated the Government of Canada’s commitment to implement the recommendations of the commission.". According to the CBC Beyond 94 website, which tracks the progress of the TRC Calls to Action by a) not started, b) in progress and c) complete. The Government of Canada had completed 10 of the 94 Calls to Action, of which three of them are in the Sports and Reconciliation section below.

TRC #87

Complete

The National Story of Aboriginal Athletes in History

"We call upon all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, sports halls of fame, and other relevant organizations, to provide public education that tells the national story of Aboriginal athletes in history."

TRC #88

Complete

Long-Term Aboriginal Athlete Development

"We call upon all levels of government to take action to ensure long-term Aboriginal athlete development and growth, and continued support for the North American Indigenous Games, including funding to host the games and for provincial and territorial team preparation and travel."

TRC #89

Not Started

The Physical Activity and Sport Act

"We call upon the federal government to amend the Physical Activity and Sport Act to support reconciliation by ensuring that policies to promote physical activity as a fundamental element of health and well-being, reduce barriers to sports participation, increase the pursuit of excellence in sport, and build capacity in the Canadian sport system, are inclusive of Aboriginal peoples."

TRC #90

Complete

National Sports Policies, Programs and Initiatives

"We call upon the federal government to ensure that national sports policies, programs, and initiatives are inclusive of Aboriginal peoples"

TRC #91

In-Progress - Projects Proposed

International Sporting Events and Territorial Protocols

"We call upon the officials and host countries of international sporting events such as the Olympics, Pan Am, and Commonwealth games to ensure that Indigenous peoples’ territorial protocols are respected, and local Indigenous communities are engaged in all aspects of planning and participating in such events."

My Latest Essays

A microsociological scientific study of Canadian society, including patterns, relationships, interactions and culture in the Olympic sport of Canoe. #WePaddle

The Assimilation of Indigenous Canoe/Kayak, within the past 150 years, in the Maritimes.


1906 - The children of the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations on route to the Christie (Kakawis) Indian residential school that operated on Meares Island off the coast of Tofino, British Columbia. The longest running school in British Columbia history where the school operated from 1900 and 1983 by the Roman Catholics.
Dr. Janice Forsyth, Vanessa Lodge-Gagne and Audrey Giles wrote a paper “Negotiating Difference: How Aboriginal Athletes in the Maritimes Brokered their Involvement in Canadian Sport” published in Taylor & Francis”. The academic paper focuses “by examining the experiences of nine elite Aboriginal athletes from the Maritimes, specifically those who won a Tom Longboat Award, through a postcolonial lens.”. The writers acknowledge that “Aboriginal perspectives on experiences in sport in Canada are largely missing from the existing body of literature on sociocultural aspects of sport, but this is especially the case in terms of Aboriginal people from the Maritimes region of Canada.


My aim is to contribute to the body of knowledge on Aboriginal sport by narrowing the topic to the assimilation of Indigenous Canoe and Kayak, within the past 150 years, in the Maritimes (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island). To which the writers claim “ Trying to find published studies on Aboriginal sport in any one of those three provinces is challenging and has certainly frustrated more than a few scholars. Ballem lamented this problem in ‘Missing from the Canadian Sport Scene: Native Athletes’ where he outlined the accomplishments of several Aboriginal athletes who competed for the Abegweit Amateur Athletic Association in Prince Edward Island at the turn of the twentieth century.”.

TRC Calls to Action

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

War Canoe Canada

A microsociological scientific study of Canadian society, including patterns, relationships, interactions and culture in the Olympic sport of Canoe. #WePaddle

My Contacts

Indigenous Sport
+123-456-789
Canada

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